|
2 minutes reading

A leader is someone who push people beyond their own boundaries to do things that they wouldn’t have deemed possible doing

A leader is someone who push people beyond their own boundaries to do things that they wouldn’t have deemed possible doing A leader is someone who push people beyond their own boundaries to do things that they wouldn’t have deemed possible doing
Source: Benjamin Zeev Herzl portayed by Israeli artist Amit Shimoni via mentalfloss
Consider the Lobster: And Other Essays
From a book
Consider the Lobster: And Other Essays
Font size
A
12 24 17
A

It is just about impossible to talk about the really important stuff in politics without using terms that have become such awful clichés they make your eyes glaze over and are hard to even hear. One such term is “leader,” which all the big candidates use all the time — as in e.g. “providing leadership,” “a proven leader,” “a new leader for a new century,” etc. — and have reduced to such a platitude that it’s hard to try to think about what “leader” really means and whether indeed what today’s Young Voters want is a leader. The weird thing is that the word “leader” itself is cliché and boring, but when you come across somebody who actually is a real leader, that person isn’t cliché or boring at all; in fact he’s sort of the opposite of cliché and boring.

Obviously, a real leader isn’t just somebody who has ideas you agree with, nor is it just somebody you happen to believe is a good guy. Think about it. A real leader is somebody who, because of his own particular power and charisma and example, is able to inspire people, with “inspire” being used here in a serious and non-cliché way. A real leader can somehow get us to do certain things that deep down we think are good and want to be able to do but usually can’t get ourselves to do on our own. It’s a mysterious quality, hard to define, but we always know it when we see it, even as kids. You can probably remember seeing it in certain really great coaches, or teachers, or some extremely cool older kid you “looked up to” (interesting phrase) and wanted to be just like. Some of us remember seeing the quality as kids in a minister or rabbi, or a scoutmaster, or a parent, or a friend’s parent, or a supervisor in a summer job. And yes, all these are “authority figures,” but it’s a special kind of authority. If you’ve ever spent time in the military, you know how incredibly easy it is to tell which of your superiors are real leaders and which aren’t, and how little rank has to do with it. A leader’s real “authority” is a power you voluntarily give him, and you grant him this authority not with resentment or resignation but happily; it feels right. Deep down, you almost always like how a real leader makes you feel, the way you find yourself working harder and pushing yourself and thinking in ways you couldn’t ever get to on your own.

In other words, a real leader is somebody who can help us overcome the limitations of our own individual laziness and selfishness and weakness and fear and get us to do better things than we can get ourselves to do on our own.

Comments are small addendum used to provided quick feedback. They are intentionally limited in size and formatting.


Please enter a value.

Your example


Please enter a value.
Other entries from " Consider the Lobster: And Other Essays "
Similar articles
Categories:
Business
The last effort to any task requires the most work The last effort to any task requires the most work
tomaszmro

The last 10% is 90% of the work.

| Approved
Categories:
Management & HR
Facing an intimidating situation, come as one, but stand as ten thousand Facing an intimidating situation, come as one, but stand as ten thousand
Maya Angelou by Henry Lee Battle

[Oprah Winfrey said in one of the interview she was giving :]

"There’s a wonderful phrase by Maya Angelou, from a poem that she wrote called “To our grandmothers”, that she says:

I come as one, but I stand as ten thousand.

So when I walk into a room, particularly before I have something really challenging to do, or I’m going to be in a circumstance where I feel I’m going to be you know, up against some difficulties. I will literally sit, and I will call on the 10,000."

Note : the actual phrase in the poem is : "I go forth along, and stand as ten thousand."

 

 

| Approved
Category:
Management & HR

It is a mistake to hire huge numbers of people to get a complicated job done. Numbers will never compensate for talent in getting the right answer (two people who don't know something are no better than one), will tend to slow down progress, and will make the task incredibly expensive.

| Approved
Category:
Management & HR
The brook's law tells us that adding human resources to an already late software projects only makes it later The brook's law tells us that adding human resources to an already late software projects only makes it later

The Brook's law states that when a person is added to a project team, and the project is already late, the project time is longer, rather than shorter. Brooks’ law is recognized as applicable to any complex endeavor involving lots of people interacting together, not just software engineering.

| Approved
Categories:
Management & HR
Our human nature tells us to help others Our human nature tells us to help others
Viktor Miller-Gausa via Behance

The results (ed. of the study): only 1 percent of the executives said managers should bother showing employees that their work makes a difference. If anything, many companies try to explain the value our work will have in our own lives, the benefits we will reap if we hit a goal, as opposed to the benefit that others will derive.

But remember our biology we are more inspired and motivated when we know we are helping biologically others. 

| Approved
Row:Column:
×
Row:Column:
×