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A spirit of adventure and desire for experience will help you overcoming your shyness

A spirit of adventure and desire for experience will help you overcoming your shyness A spirit of adventure and desire for experience will help you overcoming your shyness
Source: Dominik Mayer via Artstation
You Learn by Living
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You Learn by Living
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But again self-discipline was the great help. I had to learn to face people and I could not do it so long as I was obsessed with fears about myself, which is the usual situation with shyness. I learned a liberating thing. If you will forget about yourself, whether or not you are making a good impression on people, what they think of you, and you will think about them instead, you won't be shy.

Do the things that interest you and do them with all your heart. Don't be concerned about whether people are watch-ing you or criticizing you. The chances are that they aren't paying any attention to you. It's your attention to yourself that is so stultifying. But you have to disregard yourself as completely as possible. If you fail the first time then you'll just have to try harder the second time. After all, there's no real reason why you should fail. Just stop thinking about your-self.

A spirit of adventure and the desire for experience did more than anything to help me master my shyness. I was terribly sensitive to what people would think and feel. But my desire to taste all of life and try to understand it was so intense that I went ahead, regardless of whether or not people were watching me or approving, and so slowly acquired a new sense of freedom and confidence. Discipline of mind and body is one of the most difficult things one has to acquire, but in the long run it is a valuable ingredient of education and a tremendous bulwark in time of trouble. Certainly, it is essential in meeting defeats and recovering from disaster. No matter how hard hit you are, you can face what has to be faced if you have learned to master your own fears. 
 

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