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1 minute reading

A virus is basically a recipe for making more viruses

A virus is basically a recipe for making more viruses A virus is basically a recipe for making more viruses
Source: R1DD1CK via zbrushcentral
Virus and the Whale
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Virus and the Whale
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Viruses are tiny, but they pack a big punch. Viruses spread and multiply fast, causing some of the most common and contagious diseases in the world. If you've ever had a rash, flu, or warts, you've probably hosted a few viruses. Actually, you've hosted a few billion. Once a virus sets up residence in an organism, it doesn't stay solo for long. One type of virus, HIV, can make 10 billion new viruses in a single day.

A virus consists of a small amount of genetic material inside a protein case. The genetic material of some viruses, such as herpes viruses, is DNA, while the genetic material of other viruses, like HIV, is RNA. DNA and RNA store information for making proteins, which in turn build a complete organism.

Whether it contains DNA or RNA, a virus is basically a recipe for making more viruses. But a virus can't make new copies by itself; it needs the equipment of a living cell. Viruses attach themselves to cells and dump their genetic material inside. The virus takes over the cell's machinery, which then starts turning out copies of viruses instead of its own products. The new viruses bud from the cell and go on to infect other cells. To viruses, your cells are nothing more than giant copy machines for making more viruses.

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