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[Aesthetic aha] Most consumers are curious to discover new things yet deeply afraid of anything that's too new

[Aesthetic aha] Most consumers are curious to discover new things yet deeply afraid of anything that's too new [Aesthetic aha] Most consumers are curious to discover new things yet deeply afraid of anything that's too new
Source : Owen Gatley via Pinterest
Hit Makers
From a book
Hit Makers
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#Consumer perception
#Consumption
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#product development

Some new products and ideas slip into the well-worn grooves of people's expectations. In fifteen out of the last sixteen years, the highest-grossing movie in America has been a sequel of a previously successful movie (e.g., Star Wars) or an adaptation of a previously successful book (e.g., The Grinch). The power of well-disguised familiarity goes far beyond film. It's a political essay that expresses, with new and thrilling clarity, an idea that readers thought but never verbalized. It's a television show that introduces an alien world, yet with characters so recognizable that viewers feel as if they're wearing their skin. It's a piece of art that dazzles with a new form and yet offers a jolt of meaning. In the psychology of aesthetics, there is a name for the moment between the anxiety of confronting something new and the satisfying click of understanding it. It is called an "aesthetic aha."

This is the first thesis of the book. Most consumers are neophilic—curious to discover new things—and deeply neophobic—afraid of anything that's too new. The best hit makers are gifted at creating moments of meaning by marrying new and old, anxiety and understanding. They are architects of familiar surprises.

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