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As societies prosper, their moral code become increasingly relaxed

As societies prosper, their moral code become increasingly relaxed As societies prosper, their moral code become increasingly relaxed
Source: Holy allegory, Giovanni Bellini
A history of Western philosophy
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A history of Western philosophy
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What happened in the great age of Greece happened again in Renaissance Italy: traditional moral restraints disappeared, because they were seen to be associated with superstition; the liberation from fetters made individuals energetic and creative, producing a rare florescence of genius; but the anarchy and treachery which inevitably resulted from the decay of morals made Italians collectively impotent, and they fell, like the Greeks, under domination of nations less civilized than themselves but not so destitute of social cohesion. The result, however, was less disastrous than in the case of Greece, because the newly powerful nations, with the exception of Spain, showed themselves as capable of great achievements as the Italians had been.

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