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[disinterested joy] Beauty can only be appreciated when you are released from lifes’ necessities

[disinterested joy] Beauty can only be appreciated when you are released from lifes’ necessities [disinterested joy] Beauty can only be appreciated when you are released from lifes’ necessities
Source: Artist unknown via nade-studio
Between Past and Future
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Between Past and Future
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For these reasons any discussion of culture must somehow take as its starting point the phenomenon of art. While the thingness of all things by which we surround ourselves lies in their having a shape through which they appear, only works of art are made for the sole purpose of appearance.

The proper criterion by which to judge appearances is beauty; if we wanted to judge objects, even ordinary use-objects, by their use-value alone and not also by their appearance—that is, by whether they are beautiful or ugly or something in between—we would have to pluck out our eyes. But in order to become aware of appearances we first must be free to establish a certain distance between ourselves and the object, and the more important the sheer appearance of a thing is, the more distance it requires for its proper appreciation. This distance cannot arise unless we are in a position to forget ourselves, the cares and interests and urges of our lives, so that we will not seize what we admire but let it be as it is, in its appearance.

This attitude of disinterested joy (to use the Kantian term, uninteressiertes Wohlgefallen) can be experienced only after the needs of the living organism have been provided for, so that, released from life's necessity, men may be free for the world.

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