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Early birds are less likely to develop depression

Early birds are less likely to develop depression Early birds are less likely to develop depression
Source: Kim Salt via Behance
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Early risers have a 12 -- 27 percent lower risk of being depressed than intermediate types.

That is the result of a June 2018 study carried on 32 000 middle-to older-aged women female nurses. The research shows depression risk is not only driven only by environmental (e.g. light exposure) and lifestyle factors (e.g. work schedules) as we might think; but also by the chronotype – the propensity for the individual to sleep at a particular time during a 24-hour period.

Research founds that late chronotypes are less likely to be married, more likely to live alone and be smokers, and more likely to have erratic sleep patterns.

Are night owls doomed to be depressed? Not as long as they get enough sleep, exercise, spend time outdoors, dim the lights at night, and try to get as much light by day as possible.

Still, 4 years of study and 2,581 cases of incident depression show that early chronotypes have lower risk of depression.

Go to bed early and feel better.

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Source : Prospective study of chronotype and incident depression among middle- and older-aged women in the Nurses’ Health Study II, Céline Vetter, Journal of Psychiatric Research, August 2018

 

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Fully agree.

I bought the book "Miracle Morning" last year; and even if I have not managed to keep the rhythm of going to bed at 9pm – waking up at 4am, the book had helped me change my habits: I now switch off the lights at home around 10pm, and in any case, I try to close the eyes before 11pm.

It's been a year now ...

And .. I can say that I feel much more active, alert, energetic.

I do not know if I would have been more depressed (!) should I had continued as I did before, going to bed around 1am, but I really believe so.

Energy = well-being = more joy = less depression. I see of it this way

 

By Laurent | 19/06/2018

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