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Every successful business creates a new kind of customer

Every successful business creates a new kind of customer Every successful business creates a new kind of customer
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Every successful business creates a new kind of customer. That customer’s story changes because the business exists. There is a before-the-product story and an after-the-product story.

The change that’s brought about doesn’t have to be as monumental as the changes that companies like Google create; they can be small shifts in attitude and perception, nearly imperceptible changes in habits that become rituals over time.

Enhancing your products or services might signal advancement and feel like progress, but if there is no change in the customer, there is no innovation.

 What happens because your product exists? Or as author Michael Schrage would say, ‘Who do you want your customer to become?’ Before your product, people did. After your product, people do.

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