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Experts sometimes rely on intuition rather than analysis

Experts sometimes rely on intuition rather than analysis Experts sometimes rely on intuition rather than analysis
Source: Vladimir Manyukhin via Artstation
The Invisible Gorilla: And Other Ways Our Intuitions Deceive Us
From a book
The Invisible Gorilla: And Other Ways Our Intuitions Deceive Us
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Deliberation will outperform intuition when you have conscious access to all the necessary data. In such cases, analysis can generate new information that will help you make a better decision. Let's return for one last time to the game of chess...We presented the remarkable finding that chess grandmasters can play the game just as well blindfolded as they can with normal sight of the board. Grandmasters and masters also can play an extremely competent game with just five minutes or less in which to make all of their moves. Chris used to lose regularly to a grandmaster who played the entire game using a total of less than one minute to make all his moves, while giving Chris five minutes to make his. How is this possible?

The leading theory is that expert players recognize familiar patterns in the clusters of pieces they see on the board, and these patterns are connected in their minds to potential strategies, tactics, and even specific moves that are likely to work in those situations. In extreme cases, their pattern recognition may be so good, and their opponents so weak, that grandmasters can win games without doing much analysis at all. In essence, they can rely entirely on intuition and still play well.

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