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1 minute reading

Hesitation is the kiss of death

Hesitation is the kiss of death Hesitation is the kiss of death
Source: Miho Hirano via coreyhelfordgallery
The 5 Second Rule
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The 5 Second Rule
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It took me almost three years. I read everything I could find on the subject of change, happiness, habits, motivation, and human behavior. I read social science experiments, happiness research, books on the brain, and neuroscience studies. I didn't limit my research to the "experts;" I sent questionnaires to everyday people, like you and me, who were using the Rule. Then I got on the phone, Skype, and Google Chat, and dug into the step-by-step experiences of what someone faces the moment they choose to change. As I deconstructed the moment of change, I uncovered something fundamental about how each and every one of us is wired. Right before we're about to do something that feels difficult, scary, or uncertain, we hesitate.

Hesitation is the kiss of death. You might hesitate for just a nanosecond, but that's all it takes. That one small hesitation triggers a mental system that's designed to stop you. And it happens in less than—you guessed it—five seconds. Ever notice how fast fear and self-doubt take over your head and you start making up excuses for why you shouldn't say something or do something? We hold ourselves back in the smallest, most mundane moments every day, and that im-pads everything. If you break this habit of hesitating and you find the courage to "take some kind of action," you'll be astonished by how fast your life changes. 
 

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