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I miss seeing their eyes

I miss seeing their eyes I miss seeing their eyes
Source: Screen print by Andy Warhol via Pinterest
Queen Elizabeth 2's guide to life
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Queen Elizabeth 2's guide to life
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Presenting himself at Buckingham Palace when he first became US Ambassador to the UK in 2013, Matthew Barzun referred to the crowds who had photographed him as he drove through the London streets in the Queen’s horse-drawn carriage. The Queen looked thoughtful,

‘There’ve always been tourists and they always used to have regular cameras. They’d put them up, take a picture and then put them down. Now’ – at this point she held her hand over her face – ‘they put these things up and they never take them down.

And I miss seeing their eyes.’

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