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If you focus on efforts you are a subordinate, if your focus is on contribution, you are top management.

If you focus on efforts you are a subordinate,  if your focus is  on contribution, you are top management. If you focus on efforts you are a subordinate,  if your focus is  on contribution, you are top management.
Source : lildragn via Artstation
The Effective Executive
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The Effective Executive
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The great majority of executives tend to focus downward. They are occupied with efforts rather than with results. They worry over what the organization and their superiors "owe" them and should do for them. And they are conscious above all of the authority they "should have." As a result, they render themselves ineffectual.

The head of one of the large management consulting firms always starts an assignment with a new client by spending a few days visiting the senior executives of the client organization one by one. After he has chatted with them about the assignment and the dient organization, its history and its peo-ple, he asks (though rarely, of course, in these words): "And what do you do that justifies your being on the payroll?" The great majority, he reports, an-swer: "I run the accounting department," or "I am in charge of the sales force." Indeed, not uncommonly the answer is, 9 have 850 people working under me." Only a few say, "It's my job to give our managers the information they need to make the right decisions," or "I am responsible for finding out what products the customer will want tomorrow," or "I have to think through and prepare the decisions the president will have to face tomorrow." 

The man who focuses on efforts and who stresses his downward authority is a subordinate no matter how exalted his title and rank. But the man who focuses on contribution and who takes responsibility for results, no matter how junior, is in the most literal sense of the phrase, "top management." He holds himself accountable for the performance of the whole. 

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