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[Impostor syndrome] Despite external evidence of their competence, some people remain convinced that they are frauds

[Impostor syndrome] Despite external evidence of their competence, some people remain convinced that they are frauds [Impostor syndrome] Despite external evidence of their competence, some people remain convinced that they are frauds
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The psychological experience of believing that one's accomplishments came about not through genuine ability, but as a result of having been lucky, having worked harder than others, or having manipulated other people's impressions, has been labeled the impostor phenomenon.

This common pattern was first observed in highly successful female college students and professionals who, despite their accomplishments, were unable to internalize a sense of themselves as competent and talented. Attributing their successes not to their abilities but to external circumstances or to attributes unrelated to actual talent (e.g., personal charm, ability to read and meet other's expectations), they reported feelings of being an impostor or a fake.

They chronically feared not being able to maintain their success.

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