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Innovation can take decades to come to the market

Innovation can take decades to come to the market Innovation can take decades to come to the market
Source: Karolis Žiūkas via Artstation
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Across the 14 innovations considered in this review a review conducted in 2015, the average time from invention to widespread commercialisation was 39 years.

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Source : 

Innovation timelines from invention to Maturiy  - UKERC Technology and Policy Assessment, 2015

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Examples (3)

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How long it took for Nestlé to succeed with their Nespresso coffee machine.

So what’s your answer?

One year? Five year?

Well no. The answer is 21 years.

Based on a technology licensed from the Battelle Institute by Nestlé in… 1974, Nespresso only became profitable in 1995 after much ups and downs. 21 years were needed to make a success of the Nespresso innovation.

By Marc.Solimen | 15/05/2018

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1

It took Ikea six years from the moment they have planned their first store opening in South Korea to the moment the stored opened to the public. Six years of research with a specific end goal to comprehend the nation’s novel culture 

By lionissss | 18/05/2018

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0

It took 3 years and two months for the Soviet Union to send Sputnik,  the first satellite in History, into space

By laurent8219 | 08/12/2019

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