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Many people in the world are not lying and cheating; they're actually sort of underrepresenting themselves and their knowledge

Many people in the world are not lying and cheating; they're actually sort of underrepresenting themselves and their knowledge Many people in the world are not lying and cheating; they're actually sort of underrepresenting themselves and their knowledge
Source: Sung-choul via Pinterest
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This is not about making up a story and convincing yourself it's true. It's about believing in the things that are true and real, and that you care about. What happens often is that when we get to [a] stressful situation, we suddenly start questioning our story, the things that we believe in, because we're full of self-doubt. That actually has nothing at all to do with the validity of our story, with our knowledge. That only has to do with our emotions, the fear of being judged and being ostracized. I think it's a self-doubt that is not grounded in reality. 

But, when we believe our story, we're able to share what we know—and what we know to be true about ourselves—about whatever it is we're pitching, whether it's about our business or about our research. Whatever it is we're pitching, we're able to present that in a way that is grounded with a sense of self-trust and not self-doubt. We believe in the validity of it. That's important. It's not about making up a story and then convincing yourself it's true [...]

[...] adults are so worried about people lying—they're vigilant to look out for liars and cheats. But many more people in the world are not lying and cheating; they're [...] mistakenly self-doubting when they should feel comfortable sharing their story.

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