|
3 minutes reading

MDMA experience can be a cure to your couple issues

MDMA experience can be a cure to your couple issues MDMA experience can be a cure to your couple issues
Source: afroellemag via Instagram
A Really Good Day
From a book
A Really Good Day
Font size
A
12 24 17
A

We prepared far in advance for our first MDMA experience. We hired a reliable, mature babysitter to take care of our kids for three days, and arranged for one of their grandmothers to be on call in case of emergency. Both to enhance the experience and to minimize side effects, we followed a protocol of supplements that we found on the Web site of the Erowid Center, a clearinghouse for information on consciousness-altering drugs. We also planned to take an S SRI (Serotonin reuptake inhibito - Ed.) after the MDMA wore off, something Erowid users recommend in order to restore our depleted serotonin. Though the medical evidence for the utility of this practice is scant, it couldn't hurt.

After first making sure emergency medical care would be readily accessible in the event of a bad reaction, we drove down the coast to a small hotel on the beach, checked into a spartan though comfortable room, and promptly collapsed on the bed in blissful unconsciousness. By the time we woke up the next morning, we were so deliriously giggly from a night of unaccustomed sleep that for a moment we considered backing out. Who needs chemicals when you can get high on a good night's rest?

Still, we'd paid for the babysitter and planned so carefully, it seemed like a waste of both time and money not to go forward. We skipped breakfast (per the instructions on Erowid) and went for a hike out onto the cliffs above the beach. When we were precisely a thirty-minute walk from the hotel, we took the pills. My stomach clenched in panic as soon as I swallowed the drug. Forget the research! What if my spinal fluid vanished? I could feel it evaporating already. What if my brain overheated? A fried egg! That's what a brain on drugs looks like! I knew that for sure, because Nancy Reagan told me so!

"Look at me," my husband said. He held me by the shoulders and stared into my eyes. His pupils were not yet dilated.

"This is good," he said. "Nothing bad will happen."

"Promise?"

"I promise."

A few deep breaths later, as the fog lifted over the Pacific, we hiked slowly back to the room. We stripped, got into bed, and waited for the best sex of our lives. Whatever myths the Shulgins had sought to dispel, the drug must be called Ecstasy for a reason, right?

Not so much. MDMA certainly enhances the senses. It makes touch feel glorious. The drug first came on with what I can best describe as a wave of warm, sensual tingling. I even got wet. But neither of us experienced the profound sexual arousal we'd anticipated. In fact, nothing about the experience was what we had imagined it would be. We didn't rock the bed like a wrecking ball. We didn't trance-dance into a fatally overheated stupor. We didn't see fairies dancing in the sky, or any other visual hallucinations. The drug is not, as I said, hallucinogenic.

What we did was talk. For six hours, we talked about our feelings for each other, why we love each other, how we love each other. We talked about what we felt when we first met, how our emotional connection grew and deepened, how we might deepen it still. The best way I can describe it is that we were transported emotionally back to our relationship's early and most exciting days, to the period of our most intense infatuation, but with all the compassion and depth of familiarity of a decade of companionship. We saw each other clearly, loved each other profoundly, and basked in this reciprocated love.

The feeling lasted not for hours or for days, but for months. Actually, the truth is, it lasted forever. We've done the drug since, every couple of years, when we feel we need to recharge the batteries of our relationship. Though the experience has never again been quite so intense, it has been a reliable method of connection, of clearing away the detritus of the everyday to get to the heart of the matter. And the heart is love. We love each other so much, even when he is chewing almonds and I have to leave the house.

Comments are small addendum used to provided quick feedback. They are intentionally limited in size and formatting.


Please enter a value.

Your example


Please enter a value.
Similar articles
Category:
Love & relationships
Sex is the answer to everything Sex is the answer to everything
Matthew Heckart via Behance

I don't know the question, but sex is definitely the answer.

| Approved
Category:
Love & relationships
Couples love one another, and then drift appart
Couples love one another, and then drift appart
GIF
malditabastarda via Tumblr

My love keeps growing more passionate and egoistic, while his is waning and waning, and that's why we're drifting apart."

She went on musing.

"And there's no help for it. He is everything for me, and I want him more and more to give himself up to me entirely. And he wants more and more to get away from me. We walked to meet each other up to the time of our love, and then we have been irresistibly drifting in different directions. And there's no altering that."

| Approved
Category:
Love & relationships

A profile, a look, a voice, can capture a heart in no time at all.

| Approved
Category:
Love & relationships
Love me as I am Love me as I am
Pascal Campion via Deviantart

I'm selfish, impatient and a little insecure. I make mistakes, I am out of control and at times hard to handle. But if you can't handle me at my worst, then you sure as hell don't deserve me at my best.

| Approved
Category:
Love & relationships
2 minutes reading

"How do I know for certain that a person is the right one for me?" In interviews, I pushed ...

| Approved
Row:Column:
×
Row:Column:
×