|
Previous Next
1 minute

Mediocre people will screw up a good idea. Talented people will turn something mediocre in something better

Mediocre people will screw up a good idea. Talented people will turn something mediocre in something better Mediocre people will screw up a good idea. Talented people will turn something mediocre in something better
Creativity, Inc
From book
Creativity, Inc
Font size
A
12 24 17
A

If you give a good idea to a mediocre team, they will screw it up. If you give a mediocre idea to a brilliant team, they will either fix it or throw it away and come up with something better.

Loading …
Your example


Please enter a value.
Similar articles
Topics:
Business
The last effort to any task requires the most work The last effort to any task requires the most work
tomaszmro

The last 10% is 90% of the work

Topic:
Management & HR
The brook's law tells us that adding human resources to an already late software projects only makes it later The brook's law tells us that adding human resources to an already late software projects only makes it later

The Brook's law states that when a person is added to a project team, and the project is already late, the project time is longer, rather than shorter. Brooks’ law is recognized as applicable to any complex endeavor involving lots of people interacting together, not just software engineering.

Topic:
Management & HR
To overcome failure, it is necessary (a) to recognize the pain and, (b) recognize it is an inevitable consequence of doing something new, a process which will result in subsequent success To overcome failure, it is necessary (a) to recognize the pain and, (b) recognize it is an inevitable consequence of doing something new, a process which will result in subsequent success
Julien Pacaud via Tumblr

We need to think about failure differently.

I’m not the first to say that failure, when approached properly, can be an opportunity for growth. But the way most people interpret this assertion is that mistakes are a necessary evil. Mistakes aren’t a necessary evil. They aren’t evil at all.

They are an inevitable consequence of doing something new (and, as such, should be seen as valuable; without them, we’d have no originality). And yet, even as I say that embracing failure is an important part of learning, I also acknowledge that acknowledging this truth is not enough.

That’s because failure ...

Topic:
Management & HR
A great manager admits his own shortcomings, is not afraid to acknowledge he has a limited knowledge on a particular topic, and is ready to remodel his thinking at any time A great manager admits his own shortcomings, is not afraid to acknowledge he has a limited knowledge on a particular topic, and is ready to remodel his thinking at any time
Author unknown on Pinterest

I believe the best managers acknowledge and make room for what they do not know—not just because humility is a virtue but because until one adopts that mindset, the most striking breakthroughs cannot occur. I believe that managers must loosen the controls, not tighten them. They must accept risk; they must trust the people they work with and strive to clear the path for them; and always, they must pay attention to and engage with anything that creates fear. Moreover, successful leaders embrace the reality that their models may be wrong or incomplete. Only when we admit what we don’t ...

Topics:
Business
The single most important duty of a CEO is recruiting The single most important duty of a CEO is recruiting
Ewelina Gąska

I consider the most important job of someone like myself recruiting.

Row:Column:
×