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Most entrepreneur do not get their first project to be a success

Most entrepreneur do not get their first project to be a success Most entrepreneur do not get their first project to be a success
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The road to success is paved with Failures. The first idea people have is very rarely the one that will take off. When you look closer, most of what seem like overnight success is in reality the result of many prior failed attempts. 

2 examples

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By @StarianU on 12/05/2018

Evan Spiegel founder of Snapchat first co-founded during summer 2010 an app called “Future Freshman” just after the completed his sophomore. The app was designed to help kids get into college. It completely failed. He worked on it for about a year, he and his co-founder Murphy decided to pull the plug because… no one was using it.

Spiegel did not give up on his dream of building the next tech behemoth and finally build Snap, who came to be a $20 billion company. 

0
By @lau on 15/05/2018

Few people know it, but Twitter was born from Odeo, a Podcast service that Evan Willians (co-founder of Blogger, Twitter, and Middle) had founded after they sold Blogger. After building Odeo, the team realized that in fact they were not listening to as much podcast as they thought. And then in 2005, Apple announces that iTunes will integreate a podcasting platform, as Odeo intended to do. It was during a hackathon organized by Evan to "explore new directions" that the idea of Twitter came into being. Twitter was born out of a failure.

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