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Often, people are more interested in rewards rather than fight for a cause

Often, people are more interested in rewards rather than fight for a cause Often, people are more interested in rewards rather than fight for a cause
Source: davide bonazzi via Pinterest
A People's History of the United States
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A People's History of the United States
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Here was the traditional device by which those in charge of any social order mobilize and discipline a recalcitrant population—offering the adventure and rewards of military service to get poor people to fight for a cause they may not see clearly as their own. A wounded American lieutenant at Bunker Hill, interviewed by 'Peter Oliver, a Tory (who admittedly might have been looking for such a response), told how he had joined the rebel forces: 

I was a Shoemaker, & got my living by my Labor. When this Rebellion came on, I saw some of my Neighbors got into Commission, who were no better than myself. I was very ambitious, & did not like to see those Men above me. I was asked to enlist, as a private Soldier ... I offered to enlist upon having a Lieu-tenants Commission; which was granted. I imagined my self now in a way of Promotion: if I was killed in Battle, there would be an end of me, but if my Cap-tain was killed, I should rise in Rank, & should still have a Chance to rise high-er. These Sir! were the only Motives of my entering into the Service; for as to the Dispute between Great Britain & the Colonies, I know nothing of it.... 

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