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[panic buying] when items are acquired in preparation for a disaster

[panic buying] when items are acquired in preparation for a disaster [panic buying] when items are acquired in preparation for a disaster
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#buying (the act of)
#panic buying

As evidenced during the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic, panic buying or acquiring can also be confused with hoarding disorder. As the name implies, panic buying involves buying large quantities of goods, usually household supplies or food, in preparation for a real or anticipated disaster or crisis (such as a hurricane or pandemic). Panic acquiring is similar to panic buying, but involves the acquisition of free things, either through giveaways, services such as food pantries, or occasionally through scavenging. Although less common, panic buying can also occur when the prices are expected to rise or supply shortages are predicted for a specific product or commodity (such as chocolate or coffee). Panic buying is distinguished from hoarding in several ways. First, despite the fact that it is excessive in nature and tends to have an impulsive quality, panic buying generally tends to be targeted to items that might be needed during the feared or impending disaster, or to common household items that might be difficult to acquire in the middle of a crisis. Toilet paper and bottled water are two commonly acquired items in all types of expected or feared disasters. Gasoline, propane, and canned or dried food are commonly acquired articles when a hurricane or tornado is anticipated. During the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, hand sanitizer, household cleansers, and germicidal disposable wipes were bought in large quantities by panicked shoppers, in addition to bottled water and toilet paper, emptying store shelves of these items.

The items acquired in preparation for a disaster are typically stored and organized for easy access rather than forgotten about once purchased. Items are highly valued leading up to and during the crisis, but are often easily given away, used, sold, or otherwise disposed of once the danger has passed.

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