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People don't rise from nothing. We do owe something to where we come from

People don't rise from nothing. We do owe something to where we come from People don't rise from nothing. We do owe something to where we come from
Source: Artist unknown via Pinterest
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People don't rise from nothing. We do owe something to parentage and patronage. The people who stand before kings may look like they did it all by themselves. But in fact they are invariably the beneficiaries of hidden advantages and extraordinary opportunities and cultural legacies that allow them to learn and work hard and make sense of the world in ways others cannot. It makes a difference where and when we grew up. The culture we belong to and the legacies passed down by our forebears shape the patterns of our achievements in ways we cannot begin to imagine. It's not enough to ask what successful people are like, in other words. It is only by asking where they are from that we can unravel the logic behind who succeeds and who doesn't.

I like this anology from the book too : 

"The tallest oak in the forest is the tallest not just because it grew from the hardiest acorn; it is the tallest also because no other trees blocked its sunlight, the soil around it was deep and rich, no rabbit chewed through its bark as a sapling, and no lumberjack cut it down before it matured."

By Martijn_P | 02/07/2019

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I am considered a very intelligent student among my peers and I have read wide and deep across disciplines ranging from computers and management to core humanities subject. Before reading this book I used to think it is my hard work by virtue of which I have accomplished this by the age of 22. But after I read this book I realized in a poverty ridden country like India I was lucky to be born in a middle class family then I was lucky enough because my parents were extremely passionate teachers . I was born in a family where the only virtue of a person was his knowledge and character. I was born in a traditional "Brahmin" family, it is a caste which was at the top of hierarchy and were considered apt for intellectual work. Had I been born in my maids family I don't think my apparent hard work would have counted or even given a chance.

By shikharpathak96 | 07/05/2020

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