|
2 minutes reading

Pixar has a Storytelling Formula

Pixar has a  Storytelling Formula Pixar has a  Storytelling Formula
Source: Disney/Pixar via moviemania
Font size
A
12 24 17
A

Pixar former story artist Emma Coats tweeted en 2011 a series of “story basics”, guidelines that she learned from her more senior colleagues on how to create appealing stories. Below are the 22 rules of storytelling from Pixar:

#1: You admire a character for trying more than for their successes.

#2: You gotta keep in mind what’s interesting to you as an audience, not what’s fun to do as a writer. They can be v. different.

#3: Trying for theme is important, but you won’t see what the story is actually about til you’re at the end of it. Now rewrite.

#4: Once upon a time there was ___. Every day, ___. One day ___. Because of that, ___. Because of that, ___. Until finally ___.

#5: Simplify. Focus. Combine characters. Hop over detours. You’ll feel like you’re losing valuable stuff but it sets you free.

#6: What is your character good at, comfortable with? Throw the polar opposite at them. Challenge them. How do they deal?

#7: Come up with your ending before you figure out your middle. Seriously. Endings are hard, get yours working up front.

#8: Finish your story, let go even if it’s not perfect. In an ideal world you have both, but move on. Do better next time.

#9: When you’re stuck, make a list of what WOULDN’T happen next. Lots of times the material to get you unstuck will show up.

#10: Pull apart the stories you like. What you like in them is a part of you; you’ve got to recognize it before you can use it.

#11: Putting it on paper lets you start fixing it. If it stays in your head, a perfect idea, you’ll never share it with anyone.

#12: Discount the 1st thing that comes to mind. And the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th – get the obvious out of the way. Surprise yourself.

#13: Give your characters opinions. Passive/malleable might seem likable to you as you write, but it’s poison to the audience.

#14: Why must you tell THIS story? What’s the belief burning within you that your story feeds off of? That’s the heart of it.

#15: If you were your character, in this situation, how would you feel? Honesty lends credibility to unbelievable situations.

#16: What are the stakes? Give us reason to root for the character. What happens if they don’t succeed? Stack the odds against.

#17: No work is ever wasted. If it’s not working, let go and move on - it’ll come back around to be useful later.

#18: You have to know yourself: the difference between doing your best & fussing. Story is testing, not refining.

#19: Coincidences to get characters into trouble are great; coincidences to get them out of it are cheating.

#20: Exercise: take the building blocks of a movie you dislike. How d’you rearrange them into what you DO like?

#21: You gotta identify with your situation/characters, can’t just write ‘cool’. What would make YOU act that way?

#22: What’s the essence of your story? Most economical telling of it? If you know that, you can build out from there.

------

Source : Pixar story rules (one version), May 15, 2011, pixartouchbook

Comments are small addendum used to provided quick feedback. They are intentionally limited in size and formatting.


Please enter a value.

Your example


Please enter a value.
Similar articles
Category:
Culture
1 minute reading

The pleasures of ignorance are as great, in their way, as the pleasures of knowledge. For though the light is ...

| Approved
Category:
Culture
Reading integrates something into you, something that you did not know or had not even imagined Reading integrates something into you, something that you did not know or had not even imagined
Samantha Dodge via Tumblr

[...] the act of reading is a secret, and sometimes fertile, ceremony of communion.  Anyone who reads something that is really worth the trouble does not read with impunity.  Reading one of those books that breathe when you put them to your ear does not leave you untouched: it changes you, even if only a little bit, it integrates something into you, something that you did not know or had not imagined, and it invites you to seek, to ask questions.  And more still: sometimes it can even help you to discover the true meaning of words betrayed by the dictionary of our times.  What more could a critical consciousness want?

-----

Source : Past, Present, and Future: Interview with Eduardo Galeano, December 25, 2008, mronline

| Approved
Category:
Culture

One piece of information followed by a denial, that's two pieces of information.

| Approved
Category:
Culture
Art exists to let us feel – not see – the world
Art exists to let us feel – not see – the world
GIF
Nicolò Canova via Giphy

The basic project of art is always to make the world whole and comprehensible, to restore it to us in all its glory and its occasional nastiness, not through argument but through feeling, and then to close the gap between you and everything that is not you, and in this way pass from feeling to meaning. It’s not something that committees can do. It’s not a task achieved by groups or by movements. It’s done by individuals, each person mediating in some way between a sense of history and an experience of the world.

| Approved
Category:
Culture
The only morality of the social media algorithm is to optimise you as a consumer The only morality of the social media algorithm is to optimise you as a consumer
Eddie Lobanovskiy via Dribbble

The only morality of the algorithm is to optimise you as a consumer and in many cases you become the product. There are very few examples in human history of industries where people themselves become products and those are scary industries – slavery and the sex trade. And now we have social media. 

| Approved
Row:Column:
×
Row:Column:
×