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Probability is the acceptance of the lack of certainty in our knowledge

Probability is the acceptance of the lack of certainty in our knowledge Probability is the acceptance of the lack of certainty in our knowledge
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Fooled by Randomness
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Fooled by Randomness
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#Probability

Probability is not a mere computation of odds on the dice or more complicated variants; it is the acceptance of the lack of certainty in our knowledge and  the development of methods for dealing with our ignorance. Outside of textbooks and casinos, probability almost never presents itself as a mathematical problem or a brain teaser. Mother Nature does not tell you how many holes there are on the roulette table, nor does she deliver problems in a textbook way (in the real world one has to guess the problem more than the solution).

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