|
1 minute reading

[Red queen effect] To survive within our environment, we have to adapt, evolve, proliferate and co-evolve with the systems we interact with

[Red queen effect] To survive within our environment, we have to adapt, evolve, proliferate and co-evolve with the systems we interact with [Red queen effect] To survive within our environment, we have to adapt, evolve, proliferate and co-evolve with the systems we interact with
Source : backwardsiris via Tumblr
Deep Simplicity
From a book
Deep Simplicity
Font size
A
12 24 17
A
#Evolution (biology)

The Red Queen hypothesis, also referred to as Red Queen's effect is a hypothesis in evolutionary biology which proposes that species must constantly adapt, evolve, and proliferate in order to survive while pitted against ever-evolving opposing species. The hypothesis was intended to explain the constant (age independent) extinction probability as observed in the paleontological record caused by co-evolution between competing species.

In his book Deep Simplicity, John Gribbon describes the red queen principle with frogs :

There are lots of ways in which the frogs, who want to eat flies, and the flies, who want to avoid being eaten, interact. Frogs might evolve longer tongues, for fly-catching purposes; flies might evolve faster flight, to escape. Flies might evolve an unpleasant taste, or even excrete poisons that damage the frogs, and so on. We’ll pick one possibility. If a frog has a particularly sticky tongue, it will find it easier to catch flies. But if flies have particularly slippery bodies, they will find it easier to escape, even if the tongue touches them. Imagine a stable situation in which a certain number of frogs live on a pond and eat a certain proportion of the flies around them each year.

Because of a mutation a frog developes an extra sticky tongue. It will do well, compared with other frogs, and genes for extra sticky tongues will spread through the frog population. At first, a larger proportion of flies gets eaten. But the ones who don’t get eaten will be the more slippery ones, so genes for extra slipperiness will spread through the fly population. After a while, there will be the same number of frogs on the pond as before, and the same proportion of flies will be eaten each year. It looks as if nothing has changed – but the frogs have got stickier tongues, and the flies have got more slippery bodies.

Example

+ 15 points
Do you know an example, a fact, an evidence a personal experience which would support the theory ?


Please enter a value.

Interpretation

+ 15 points
Do you believe this entry can have a different reading, or that you can bring clarification to the text of the author ?


Please enter a value.

Comment

+ 5 points
Would you like to share an opinion on this
article ?


Please enter a value.


Please enter a value.
Similar articles
Category:
Biology
1 minute reading

Journalist : Do you think that people may be starting to think that ageing is the real enemy? Aubrey de Grey ...

| Approved
Category:
Biology
1 minute reading

It doesn't matter whether we are talking about criminality, or psychological characteristics, or psychiatric disorders, or perfectly normal human behaviours ...

| Approved
Categories:
Biology
7 minutes reading

Drugs are the product of a complex evolutionary game. As fungi and plants evolved, some developed chemicals in their leaves ...

| Approved
Categories:
Biology
2 minutes reading

Oxytocin is the most people's favorite chemical. It's the feeling of friendship, love or deep trust. It is the feeling ...

| Approved
Category:
Biology
7 minutes reading

The excerpt below describes the symptoms of the deadly Ebola virus as they appeared in one of its first known ...

| Approved
Row:Column:
×
Row:Column:
×
Row:Column:
×
Row:Column:
×