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Seashore used to be a scary place

Seashore used to be a scary place Seashore used to be a scary place
Source: Grotti Lotti via grottilotti
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(…) millions of Americans will flock to the beach, taking advantage of long days, warm weather and the end of classes. From Coney Island and Venice Beach to the shores of Lake Michigan and the Gulf Coast, bags will be packed, coolers dragged, sunscreen slathered, and sandcastles built. Similar scenes will be repeated around the world. In Rio de Janeiro, Sydney, Barcelona, and Beirut, children will be splashing in the waves while sunbathers doze on the sand. A day at the beach is a cultural ritual.

(…) But it hasn’t always been this way. From antiquity up through the 18th century, the beach stirred fear and anxiety in the popular imagination. The coastal landscape was synonymous with dangerous wilderness; it was where shipwrecks and natural disasters occurred.(…) real hazards that arrived on the shore: pirates and bandits, crusaders and colonizers, the Black Death and smallpox.

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Source : Inventing the Beach: The Unnatural History of a Natural Place (English), June 23, 2016, smithsonianmag.com

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