|
1 minute reading

Silent language is responsible for raising barriers between individuals of different nationalities and causes what is known as “cultural shock”

Silent language is responsible for raising barriers between individuals of different nationalities and causes what is known as “cultural shock” Silent language is responsible for raising barriers between individuals of different nationalities and causes what is known as “cultural shock”
Font size
A
12 24 17
A

Doctor in Philosophy and anthropologist Edward T. Hall has dedicated his life to research in cultural perception of space, intercultural communication techniques (which he will then expand to business world) and proxemics, this branch of knowledge which studies the physical distance between people during an interaction.

In 1959 he introduced the concept of silent language in his book The silent language. He observed that culture is a non-verbal communication and it is culture which builds a silent link between individuals, but also that this same silent language is responsible for raising barriers between individuals of different nationalities.

Hall then dissect intercultural communication via its concept of "major triad". According to him, this is the backbone of all cultures:

  • The formal is what is lived daily by the individual, known and perfectly mastered,
  • The informal is linked to a specific practice, specific to rare, sometimes unknown and uncontrolled situations
  • The technique is the scientific approach of a theme, acquired through the explicit communication

What Hall did for us in 1959 is to study the roots of what we today call a "cultural shock": the feeling that permeates us when faced with a different culture. This feeling where it seems that people around behave in a completely irrational and often frustrating way; ultimately unpleasant, and sometimes without even a single word exchanged.

Source and inspiration :

Edward T. Hall, The Silent Language, Doubleday & company, New York, 1959

Christine Geoffroey, Management interculturel, Recherche & Formation,  2000

Comments are small addendum used to provided quick feedback. They are intentionally limited in size and formatting.


Please enter a value.

Your example


Please enter a value.
Similar articles
Categories:
Management & HR
Facing an intimidating situation, come as one, but stand as ten thousand Facing an intimidating situation, come as one, but stand as ten thousand
Maya Angelou by Henry Lee Battle

[Oprah Winfrey said in one of the interview she was giving :]

"There’s a wonderful phrase by Maya Angelou, from a poem that she wrote called “To our grandmothers”, that she says:

I come as one, but I stand as ten thousand.

So when I walk into a room, particularly before I have something really challenging to do, or I’m going to be in a circumstance where I feel I’m going to be you know, up against some difficulties. I will literally sit, and I will call on the 10,000."

Note : the actual phrase in the poem is : "I go forth along, and stand as ten thousand."

 

 

| Approved
Category:
People relations

We do not love people so much for the good they have done us, as for the good we do them.

| Approved
Category:
People relations

Love does not consist of gazing at each other, but in looking outward together in the same direction.

| Approved
Categories:
Business
The last effort to any task requires the most work The last effort to any task requires the most work
tomaszmro

The last 10% is 90% of the work.

| Approved
Category:
People relations

According to Duke University researchers, we're not only attracted to people who smile but we also tend to remember their names. In a 2008 fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging) study, Professors Takashi Tsuldura and Roberto Cabeza showed subjects pictures of smiling and unsmiling individuals, followed by their names, e.g. "Nancy," "Amber," "Kitty," and so on. The results found that the subjects' orbitofrontal cortices—the region of the brain associated with reward processing—were more active when the subjects were learning and recalling the names of smiling individuals. "We are sensitive to positive social signals," Cabeza explained. "We want to remember people who were kind to us, in case we interact with them in the future."

| Approved
Row:Column:
×
Row:Column:
×