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1 minute reading

Society is under the theart of lack of metacognition

Society is under the theart of lack of metacognition Society is under the theart of lack of metacognition
Source: Markus "Braxxy" BrackelmannP via Artstation
The Assault on Intelligence
From a book
The Assault on Intelligence
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There may (...) have been something more involved here as well, something even more troubling: the candidate often didn't know what he was talking about, and he may not have known that he didn't know.

Tom Nichols, a professor of national security affairs at the Naval War College, laments the post-truth world in his 2017 book The Death of Expertise. Nichols is pretty aggressive: "The United States is now a country obsessed with the worship of its own ignorance . . . Google-fueled, Wikipedia-based, blog sodden .. . [with] an insistence that strongly held opinions are indistin-guishable from facts."' Early in the work he introduces the con-cept of metacognition, essentially the ability to think about thinking, which leads to the "ability to know when you're not good at something." He cites a singer knowing when she has hit a sour note, a director knowing when a scene isn't working. If you lack metacognition, those discoveries are beyond you.

Nichols credits a 1999 study by Justin Kruger and David Dunning, research psychologists at Cornell, with driving home this point. Nichols writes, "The lack of metacognition sets up a vi-cious loop in which people who do not know much about a subject do not know when they're in over their head . . . and there is no way to educate or inform people who, when in doubt, will make stuff up."

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