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Some of the most important discovery of our times were made under LSD

Some of the most important discovery of our times were made under LSD Some of the most important discovery of our times were made under LSD
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A Really Good Day
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A Really Good Day
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Most of us are well aware of the legacy of psychedelic experimentation in music and art. We know Lucy's in the sky with diamonds and the piper's at the gates of dawn. What's less well known is that a variety of scientists and technologists have used LSD as a catalyst for innovation.

For example, Francis Crick, co-winner of the 1962 Nobel Prize in Medicine for the discovery of the structure of the DNA molecule, reportedly experimented with LSD while working on the problem. Though he never confirmed the rumors, friends insist that he told them he actually conceived of the double-helix shape during an LSD trip.

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