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Sometimes, you need to have the strength to ignore other people's inputs

Sometimes, you need to have the strength to ignore other people's inputs Sometimes, you need to have the strength to ignore other people's inputs
Source: Kevin HOHLER via Behance
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I think one of the things that kills great things so often is compromise—letting people talk you out of what your gut is telling you. Not that I don't value people's input, but you have to have the strength to ignore it sometimes, too.

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