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1 minute reading

The simple story test

The simple story test The simple story test
Source : drane999 via tumblr
Winning the Story Wars
From a book
Winning the Story Wars
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#Storytelling

The more you can answer "yes" to these questions, the closer you are to storytelling success.

TANGIBLE: Stories present information that makes concepts visible and human scale. They make people feel that they can "touch" and "see" an idea. Does your communication provide a who, what, where, and when?

RELATABLE: Stories matter to us because their characters carry values that we want to see either rewarded or punished. Do you find that you can identify with- or are in emotional opposition to – the character in your communication because you understand what motivates them?

IMMERSIVE: Stories allow people to feel that they have experienced things thot they have only seen or heard. Can you learn something of clear value for your own life from the characters' experiences?

MEMORABLE: Stories use rich scenes and metaphors that help us to remember their messages without conscious effort. Does your communication leave you with a lasting image—transmitted either in pictures or in text—that can be easily recalled and reminds you of the core message?

EMOTIONAL: Stories elevate emotional engagement to the level of, and often beyond, intellectual understanding. Does your communication make you feel something rather than just think something?

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