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We are in the habit of exaggerating, or imagining, or anticipating, sorrow

We are in the habit of exaggerating, or imagining, or anticipating, sorrow We are in the habit of exaggerating, or imagining, or anticipating, sorrow
Source: Sam Jack Gilmore via Giphy
Moral letters to Lucilius
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Moral letters to Lucilius
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There are more things, Lucilius, likely to frighten us than there are to crush us; we suffer more often in imagination than in reality.(…) What I advise you to do is, not to be unhappy before the crisis comes; since it may be that the dangers before which you paled as if they were threatening you, will never come upon you; they certainly have not yet come. Accordingly, some things torment us more than they ought; some torment us before they ought; and some torment us when they ought not to torment us at all. We are in the habit of exaggerating, or imagining, or anticipating, sorrow.

- Letter XIII. On Groundless Fears -

 

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