|
1 minute reading

We are in the habit of exaggerating, or imagining, or anticipating, sorrow

We are in the habit of exaggerating, or imagining, or anticipating, sorrow We are in the habit of exaggerating, or imagining, or anticipating, sorrow
Source: Sam Jack Gilmore via Giphy
Moral letters to Lucilius
From a book
Moral letters to Lucilius
Font size
A
12 24 17
A

There are more things, Lucilius, likely to frighten us than there are to crush us; we suffer more often in imagination than in reality.(…) What I advise you to do is, not to be unhappy before the crisis comes; since it may be that the dangers before which you paled as if they were threatening you, will never come upon you; they certainly have not yet come. Accordingly, some things torment us more than they ought; some torment us before they ought; and some torment us when they ought not to torment us at all. We are in the habit of exaggerating, or imagining, or anticipating, sorrow.

- Letter XIII. On Groundless Fears -

 

Comments are small addendum used to provided quick feedback. They are intentionally limited in size and formatting.


Please enter a value.

Your example


Please enter a value.
Similar articles
Category:
Philosophy
| Approved
Categories:
Life
Live trough simplicity, patience, compassion Live trough simplicity, patience, compassion
Artist unknow via Pinterest

Simplicity, patience, compassion.
These three are your greatest treasures.
Simple in actions and thoughts, you return to the source of being.
Patient with both friends and enemies,
you accord with the way things are.
Compassionate toward yourself,
you reconcile all beings in the world.

| Approved
Category:
Philosophy

Cultivate your intelligence, dear students, but also take care that it does not subordinate itself to everything else, and that the accessory does not become the main one. May your heart not be the fool of your mind. Pascal said: "The heart has its reasons of which reason knows nothing"; yet this deep word is not of absolute accuracy. For if the heart has its reasons, Reason knows them and recognizes itself in them.

The whole work of Reason consists in subordinating Intelligence to the Heart.

| Approved
Category:
Philosophy
2 minutes reading

Any ideal, any preferred world, is a way of asking, what kind of world are we living in that makes ...

| Approved
Category:
Philosophy
We cannot comprehend life in rational terms We cannot comprehend life in rational terms
Artist unknown via Pinterest

What is demanded of man is not, as some existential philosophers teach, to endure the meaninglessness of life, but rather to bear his incapacity to grasp the unconditional meaningfulness of life in rational terms.

| Approved
Row:Column:
×
Row:Column:
×