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We live in a post-truth era, where objective facts are less influential in shaping public opinion than appeals to emotion and personal belief

We live in a post-truth era,  where objective facts are less influential in shaping public opinion than appeals to emotion and personal belief We live in a post-truth era,  where objective facts are less influential in shaping public opinion than appeals to emotion and personal belief
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The Assault on Intelligence
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The Assault on Intelligence
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(…) Deeply involved in this is the question of truth. It was no accident that the Oxford English Dictionary's word of the year in 2016 was "post-truth," a condition where objective facts are less influential in shaping public opinion than appeals to emotion and personal belief. Liberal British academic and philosopher A. C. Grayling characterized the emerging post-truth world to me as "over-valuing opinion and preference at the expense of proof and data." Oxford Dictionaries president Casper Grathwohl predicted that the term could become "one of the defining words of our time."

Grayling is a scholar of the Enlightenment, and he concedes that this new dynamic challenges the mode of thought dominant in the West since that era, a mode that until recently valued experience and expertise, the centrality of fact, humility in the face of complexity, the need for study, and a respect for ideas. At its best, the craft of intelligence, at least as practiced in the Western liberal tradition, pursues these Enlightenment values. Intelligence gathers, evaluates, and analyzes information and then disseminates its conclusions for use, study, or refutation. So the erosion of Enlightenment values would certainly devalue or even threaten the practice of good intelligence.

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