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1 minute reading

Who we are and who we become depends, in part, on whom we love

Who we are and who we become depends, in part, on whom we love Who we are and who we become depends, in part, on whom we love
Source: Saatchiart
A General Theory of Love
From a book
A General Theory of Love
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In a relationship, one mind revises the other; one heart changes its partner. This astounding legacy of our combined status as mammals and neural beings is limbic revision: the power to remodel the emotional parts of the people we love, as our Attractors [coteries of ingrained information patterns] activate certain limbic pathways, and the brain’s inexorable memory mechanism reinforces them.

Who we are and who we become depends, in part, on whom we love.

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